About your Search

20130117
20130125
STATION
CSPAN 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the question is what urgency to do they place on that. we had an election two months ago where there were two candidates, one was more focused on cutting the deficit and reducing our long term debt and one didn't think it was a big concern. the one who didn't think it was a big concern won the election. yes, voters seem to say that is an issue they agree with, but when it came to election day two months ago that certainly wasn't one of the top issues they voted on because they voted for the candidate who wasn't embody go it. >> heather: through his actions, as well. that leads to this, how f or if it should be raised? should the debt limit be raised again, 23% say yes, but 69% don't agree with the president. they say raise it only after major cuts. there again what cuts would those be but president obama as we know he increased the debt by $6 trillion in his if you are four years. some say that administration overspent by one trillion a year every year since he's been in office. now she demanding the get ceiling to be increased again. do you think he will be listen to the 69% that say only af
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in women's security that will be part of the report. secondly, improving gender sensitivity and responsiveness among the afghan security forces and increasing the recruitment and retention of women in the afghan security forces. so both with regard to the election and women and girls. >> senator with r
. that is one of the reasons he won re-election in difficulty fashion in 2010. now in 2014 other democratic senators in swing states who are up. jon: up for re-election. >> that's right. jon: if they cast a vote that is seen to be against the interests of firearms owners, hunters and the like, they could be in real trouble? >> guns and nra are both very popular in states like alaska and montana and arkansas and south dakota where there's a hunting culture, and, those senators like mark begich in alaska, will he actually vote for a gun ban? that i think is very problematic for the president. you're hearing some of these democrats, either noncommittal and saying i think this goes too far. jon: i was a little surprised when i heard about the executive actions the president was taking. it didn't seem to amount to, you know, large steps? >> no, i think that's right. they were pretty small things. a couple of things that might make a difference are on mental health, particularly easing privacy laws, rules, which make it difficult for somebody to speak about a young person's potential danger to an
. but when so much of the political talk in the final weeks of the election campaign were about talking points and so forth, which is its own legitimate area, it was interesting to see how careful she was in making certain that she had no part in that. >> one other story we were talking about at the top of the show, the pentagon today will announce that women will now be allowed to serve in full combat roles. at first they'll be phased into roles working as medics and manning artillery, but eventually they could serve in elite commando units directly in the line of fire. for the past ten years, u.s. military women have served at the front lines in both iraq and afghanistan but never in combat. 152 women have been killed in the course of both conflicts. of course, we've been talking around the table about this. there are some contrarian points of view. >> yeah, there's a piece on the op-ed page of "the wall street journal" this morning. ryan smith is a marine infantrymen that served in iraq. he writes about "the reality that awaits women in combat. societal norms are a reality, and their
to be back pedaling. al franken is up for re-election. today he put out statement saying in principle he supports a ban on assault weapons but didn't say he supports legislation to do that. what the fear is i'm told by one top democratic senator an assault weapons ban suggests the president is taking weapons away that plays into republican arguments like marco rubio who said this today on fox. >> there is a second amendment. i didn't write the constitution. i believe in it. if you are going to do anything that impacts it. it better make some sense. here is the problem that i have by the president's own admission, the things that they're putting forward would have done nothing to prevent what happened, for example, in connecticut. >> and that's why top democratic senator is telling me privately he thinks it's much more likely that the president will not get a ban on assault weapons. but, instead, will get something that's less controversial like a national background check, having a system like that. that's more likely to go through, bill. >> bill: ed, thank you. ed henry at the white hou
island share the highest job lest rate at 10.#%. the usual suspects with an unusual job. the obama re-election team is morphing to a political advocacy group. you will recognize many of the players. chief white house correspondent ed henry on the first of its kind move. president obama's final campaign ended 7 # days ago. or did it? adding new meaning to term "permanent campaign" the president is converting the chicago campaign apparatus to a non-profit lobbying group. aimed to pressure congress to support the second term agenda quickly after monday's inaugural. >> i think you will see the strength of the campaign organization turn over to the new issue advocacy organization. and put their muscle behind passing comprehensive immigration reform. passing responsiblebe gun safety measures. >> the group launchs sunday at obama campaign legacy conference in washington. at the helm, will be the president's campaign manager. jim messina and other familiar faces. stephanie cutter, robert gibbs and david axelrod. a team that has now won two big races. although the republicans note campaign style pressu
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)